Your company could spend all the money it wants recruiting, interviewing, and hiring the best people around. But if the boss is a jerk, those people will leave the first chance they get.

In contrast, if you have great managers and team leads, not only will you get the best out of your people, but they'll also be more likely to stick around.

I want that for you and your business so today I’m giving you the 7 things the best bosses do.

1. They’re a good coach

Rather than solve every problem as soon as it arises, the best managers use problems as teaching moments.

They guide their teams and share insights when needed. This allows their team to gain valuable experience and grow.

2. They empower their team and do not micromanage

Great managers give their people the freedom they crave: freedom to explore their ideas, to take (smart) risks, and to make mistakes. 

They also provide the physical tools their people need, and allow for flexible schedules and working environments. 

Roy (in the panda head) is a manager that provides his team with plenty of room to take risks.

Roy (in the panda head) is a manager that provides his team with plenty of room to take risks.

3. They create an inclusive team environment, showing concern for success and well-being

In a research project, Google discovered that the single greatest key to a team's performance was creating a "psychologically safe" environment.

In other words, great teams thrive on trust--and great managers help build that trust.

4. They are productive and results-oriented

The best managers are more than star players--they make their teammates better, too. 

They do so by setting the right example and getting down and dirty whenever necessary. They're not afraid to roll up their sleeves and help out, and that motivates their team.

5. They are a good communicator

The best managers are great listeners. This helps them to better understand their teams, and show appropriate empathy. 

Additionally, good managers realize knowledge is power. That's why they are transparent and willing to share information with their teams, so their people know the "why" behind the "what."

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6. They have a clear vision/strategy for the team

Great managers know exactly where the team is right now, where they are headed, and what they need to do to get there. 

They also make sure each team member understands their individual role in executing that strategy.

7. They are a strong decision maker

Great managers aren't impulsive, but they are decisive. After getting to know the facts and considering the thoughts and perspectives of their teams, they move things forward--even if that requires making a decision not everyone will approve of.

If your company can train and promote managers who do these 7 things, you'll build trust and inspire your people to become the best versions of themselves.

They'll follow, not because they have to. But because they want to.

 


Roy Lamphier is Founder and CEO of Excelerate Americathe fun, smart service for small businesses. Roy's passion for entrepreneurship, tech and helping small enterprises succeed are central to the Excelerate America ethos. Does your boss do something awesome? Share it with Roy at roy.lamphier@excelerateamerica.com. 

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